In Appreciation of Teachers

In Appreciation of Teachers

The sixth grade student read from the Torah for the first time, with some apparent nerves, and when she was done, shared a hi-five and big smile with her teacher, who was clearly filled with pride. The first grade student came off the school bus in tears, and as comforting as I tried to be, I could see the relief that she felt in the moment when I brought her to her teacher. This week, Teacher Appreciation Week, we celebrate and thank our teachers for all that they do from the big moments to each and every small moment.

At Schechter Manhattan our extraordinary faculty make a positive difference in the lives of our students each day. They nurture positive and trusting relationships with their students, so that students feel safe to take risks in their learning.  Our teachers work tirelessly to bring to life the school’s mission. They make it happen: the student centered learning activities, opportunities for reflection, community building, sharing ideas, asking questions, and doing good that make up our days at Schechter Manhattan.

I am deeply appreciative of our faculty. Thank you for creating engaging lessons that spark your students’ curiosity. Thank you for being ready with the next question to help your students move along their path of learning. Thank you for gathering lots of assessment data about your students so that you know them really well. Thank you for developing differentiated learning materials so that students can engage at the just right level of challenge. Thank you for encouraging your students to look at their work carefully and to aspire ever higher levels of quality. Thank you for facilitating respectful classroom dialogue so that your students learn to treat each other with care especially when they disagree. Thank you for greeting your students each morning with a smile.  Thank you for offering your students compassion and the opportunity to learn when they make mistakes. Thank you for leading your students in helping others through community service activities and the tzedakah roundtable. Thank you for partnering with your students’ parents by communicating with them about their children’s progress and writing those extensive and in depth reports. Thank you for being role models of menschlichkeit and ethical behavior. Thank you for being there for your students when they need you.

I invite all of the members of the Schechter Manhattan community to join me in thanking our faculty for all of the amazing work that they do.

Ben_Mann_Signature_small

Benjamin Mann

 

Author’s Chair

Each week we feature the written work of our students. We hope you will stop by every week and see what they are writing and thinking about.

 

Gan

Children in Gan have been learning about Eric Carle, the author and illustrator of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, and other childhood favorites.  After reading several books by the author, students began to think of their own characters in his style.  Here are some of their ideas!

 

The Very BRAV DOLFiN

– Ohev

 

The Very hAPPY DrAGOn

– Ezra

 

The Very SPEDE lion

– Eli

 

The Very haPee Sea lion

– Katarina

 

The Very diZZY daieR

– Emmy

 

The Very Tiyrd DallFiN

– Louisa

 

The Very loNely BAtRFlI

– Adele

 

Kitah Bet

The Kitah Bet students wrote stories about the main characters from the books they are reading in their Series Reading Group.

Click here to see work by Raphael, Ariel, Pemberley, David, and Yonah.

 

Kitah Dalet

Kitah Dalet students practiced responding to a prompt.  After reading a question, they wrote brief outlines and turned it into an organized and detailed paragraph.

Click here to see work by Maya, Abby, Annabelle, Sarah, Hannah, Rafi, Simon, Arielle, Yadin, and Ari.

 

Kitah Vav

After reading an article about food waste, students wrote a rough draft expository essay describing three steps young people can take to help address the problem. The essays have many errors as we are in the process of editing and revising them.

 

About 130 billion pounds of food gets thrown away in the US in a year. About half of the food that was thrown away is edible. If we stop wasting good food, we could feed thousands of americans that are hungry. There are many ways we could help stop wasting food.

When you go to the supermarket you are probably thinking that you will need a lot of food, but think about how much you eat in one week. Recording what you eat in the last week, might be a good idea to prevent over buying, and eventually wasting food. You don’t need to buy too much food, you can always go back and buy more, buying too much food can lead to having many of it go bad before you can even get a chance to dig it from behind of your fridge. When you go to the supermarket you are probably thinking that you will need a lot of food, but think about how much you eat in one week. Recording what you eat in the last week, might be a good idea to prevent over buying, and eventually wasting food.

Many people don’t check the expiration date and throw it away because it feels like it’s been in your house for a long time, but most food can actually be eaten after their expiration date. You can drink milk after the expiration date for at least two days. Also canned food, can last much longer after its expiration date.

When you throw your leftovers you are throwing away good food, that you could keep for dinner or lunch the following day. You can even keep the leftovers and turn them into something else. For example, turning your pasta with bolognese from last evening, to today’s lasagna. There are many things you can do with leftovers instead of wasting them.

In conclusion, there are many hungry people in the world, it is wrong to throw away food when other people need it. I think people should reconsider a few times before they buy too much food and end up throwing it away.
– Maya

Food waste in the U.S. is a big issue, over 40 % of all food is wasted each year. The average family in America wastes 1000$ on food to the trash each year. So here are several things that YOU can do to help with this issue.

One easy way to help with this problem that takes only little effort is too check the expiration date before throwing away something, to you it feels like it’s been in your house for a long time, but most food can actually be eaten after their expiration date. You can drink milk after the expiration date for at least two days. Also canned food, it can last much longer after its expiration date. Another way you can help is to wait until your groceries are all used up before buying more, or when you buy more put the new stuff to the back and the old stuff to the front so you use it up before it gets bad.

About 40% of all our food gets wasted, but maybe we can try to lower that percentage by doing some of the things I listed above. Also one more thing that you can do is if you have some food that might expire soon then you should eat that before it expired and before you go out buying new things.
– Valentina

 

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